16
Jan
09

Day 106 of a 365-Day Portrait of Canada: Town of Belleville

Belleville is located at the mouth of the Moira River on the Bay of Quinte in southeastern Ontario. 

Originally the site of a Native settlement known as Asukhknosk, the future location of the city was settled by United Empire Loyalists in 1789, after which it became known as Meyer’s Creek. It was renamed Belleville in honour of Lady Arabella Gore in 1816, after a visit to the settlement by Sir Francis Gore and his wife. Belleville became an important railway junction with the completion of the Grand Trunk Railway in 1855. In 1858 the iron bridge over the Moira at Bridge Street became the first iron bridge in Hastings County. Belleville’s strikingly beautiful Gothic city hall was constructed in 1872. The City Hall tower stands some 185 feet above street level. (taken and adapted from Wikipedia)

Belleville Firefighters

belleville-firefighters

Faces Of The Day

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Belleville Fire Captain Peter Helm – 28 years as a firefighter in Belleville

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Ice Breaker on River in Belleville

ice-breaker

Lawn Chairs In Ice

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Belleville City Hall and Water Tower

belleville-city-hall-water-tower

Downtown Belleville

downtown-beleville

Flag Of The Day

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Sad Flag Of The Day

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Video of the Day: Ice Breaker in Belleville

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1 Response to “Day 106 of a 365-Day Portrait of Canada: Town of Belleville”


  1. 1 DMR
    January 17, 2009 at 10:33 pm

    Heide & Tim,
    Your next visit to Prince Edward County should be in the spring/summer. The climate is wonderfully ‘soft’ and the farm fields and orchards have a delightful ‘green’ atmosphere about them, always comforting and reminiscent of Ireland and low-land Scotland. Nearby is Sandbanks Provincial park, where you will find beaches where with a wee bit of imagination you might just believe you are in the the Carolinas or in parts of Florida — lovely sand and crystal blue waters. The nearby ‘sand-dunes’ are a must — a real nature habitat with great diversity in plants, animals and birds. I’m certain wintertime offers a grand barren-scape as remote and distinct with snow and ice as it will be later in the season when you’ll find the dunes,equally remote, but covered in summer wildflowers and with traces of foraging deer and rabbit.


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